Should you Work Out When Sore?

Should you Work Out When SoreIf you are asking yourself if you should work out when sore we need to first explain exactly what your soreness is and the reason you are sore. The most important aspect of even thinking about training when you are sore is to know exactly why you are sore in the first place.

There is a very big difference between being sore because you went on a long hike yesterday than being sore from doing pyramids or negatives the day before in the weight room. The small micro tears that you get in your muscle fibres are the best indication that you are growing your muscles.

There are many bodybuilders who use the feeling of muscle soreness to get more motivated simply because it means that you are still growing. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is something that has been very well documented and researched by sports scientist.

It is highly recommended that you do not take any ant-inflammatory medications as or pain killers as it will be masking the true soreness that you are getting. It can also make you go past the pain barrier a bit easier and can possibly cause too much damage and even injury.

You need to be able to know the difference between normal soreness that you get when you work out correctly and the possibility of an injury that you have picked up. There is a very distinctive difference between these two types of muscle pain and you need to know what that difference is.

The last point that needs to be mentioned is that all muscles are made from proteins and that the repair can be sped up by eating more protein. There have been a few specific studies done on this subject which showed that having post workout protein drinks can help to decrease all muscle soreness.

The bottom line is that when you have muscle soreness in certain body-parts that you trained hard yesterday or the day before you can easily train other body-parts as long as you are eating correctly and drinking plenty of water. Anyone who trains with weights needs to be very aware of the symptoms of over training.

Alan Mikesky, Ph.D. who is the director of human performance and biomechanics at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis says that "If your muscle is sore to the touch or the soreness limits your range of motion, its best that you give the muscle at least another day of rest.”

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